Australian Open 2017: It’s OK for unvaccinated players

Written by Staff Writer Sydney, Australia (CNN) — Australian tennis officials say unvaccinated players have been cleared to take part in this year’s Australian Open in Melbourne. The tournament follows a World Health Organization…

Australian Open 2017: It's OK for unvaccinated players

Written by Staff Writer

Sydney, Australia (CNN) — Australian tennis officials say unvaccinated players have been cleared to take part in this year’s Australian Open in Melbourne.

The tournament follows a World Health Organization announcement last month that it has “moved from phase three to phase four,” meaning more people will be allowed to travel to Australia.

The number of people affected by Australian E-Vaccinations regulations increased in September 2015 when most of the state of Victoria was involved in a major outbreak of whooping cough.

As a result, Australian Open director Craig Tiley said vaccination requirements for tournaments were “being phased in.”

“Our partners at Tennis Australia are announcing today that they are inviting more players not to immunize — providing that the person has completed all of their compulsory vaccinations,” Tiley said.

Last year the number of players who didn’t meet vaccination requirements was 7%.

A WHO spokesperson said: “

For people attending the Australian Open, appropriate health care services are in place to treat vaccine-preventable illnesses in all entry areas.”

WHO’s patient protection program works with the World Health Organization and health services to “protect the health of the people who can be exposed to communicable diseases by promoting the use of WHO-recommended vaccines and treatments.”

Tiley said Tennis Australia was working with the tennis federations of other countries to promote vaccination.

“We’ve advised the sports federations in other countries that have not been fully vaccinated that they can take players they can take the whole players team and also their parents,” he added.

Australia’s Minister for Health, Sussan Ley, said vaccination levels in the country had improved over the past decade.

“At the Australian Open 2015, for example, there were 58% of Australia’s population correctly immunized for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus and polio (against five diseases),” she said.

“(The) Travel Health Office of World Health Organization and Australian Federal Government have helped us rebuild the vaccination rates for measles in Australia and saw that return to the 90% level in Australia last year.”

Patrimonial case

Tennis Australia had previously put on hold its participation in this year’s tournament because of the WHO’s phase three announcement.

However, the decision has been made to allow all players to compete at the event.

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