Canada man charged for forging local child immunisation card

Image copyright SGI Image caption Some Nova Scotia residents can be charged with careless use of the 21-character infant immunization card if it’s found in the community Canadian police have arrested a man on…

Canada man charged for forging local child immunisation card

Image copyright SGI Image caption Some Nova Scotia residents can be charged with careless use of the 21-character infant immunization card if it’s found in the community

Canadian police have arrested a man on charges of fraud for allegedly forging a card to vaccinate children.

An employee at a Nova Scotia hospital uncovered the forgery last month.

If determined to be genuine, it would mean anyone in the community with the forged card would be charged with “negligent use of immunization card”.

The case is a “game changer” for police, said superintendent Ron McKerlie, of the RCMP in Nova Scotia.

“What if, while you’re creating a disc, you record something on that disc that you were not really intending to record? What would happen?” he asked.

Image copyright SGI Image caption Actors dressed as doctors played doctors on television to help voters prepare for the 2006 referendum to include human papillomavirus vaccinations in public school immunisation schedules

Image copyright SGI Image caption Children in need of medical treatment receive a licensed immunization card to show that they have been immunised

The identity of the suspect has not been released.

Charges have been laid but the case has to go through the courts, and the suspect has not yet entered a plea.

If convicted, he faces six years in prison and several hundred thousand dollars in fines.

Help to clear up confusion

The card, known as a COVID-19, is made up of 21 characters which, when joined, make an image of a child.

The child’s name, age, date of birth, vaccination history and, if possible, the child’s genetic data is contained in the card, which is valid for two years.

Image copyright SGI Image caption Police said the police would soon be reviewing videos of actors practising the chip encoded card

A certificate is required when the COVID-19 card is used to immunise a child in school or healthcare facilities.

Police said that people in the community need not get the COVID-19 card or risk being charged.

However, they want to clear up any confusion with the scheme and reassure parents that the card is not required for everything, just certain vaccinations.

Police said the police would soon be reviewing videos of actors practising the chip encoded card.

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