Pfizer drug was shown to improve response to drugs used to treat a muscle disorder

A Pfizer drug boosted the effectiveness of a drug to treat infantile spasms, an infantile muscular disease, said the drugmaker, in a study published online Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. The…

Pfizer drug was shown to improve response to drugs used to treat a muscle disorder

A Pfizer drug boosted the effectiveness of a drug to treat infantile spasms, an infantile muscular disease, said the drugmaker, in a study published online Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study tested the long-term use of a Pfizer booster called empagliflozin against a recently approved drug called Omicron, which combines an original steroid with levodopa to treat spasms.

The so-called catch-up study was planned by the researchers but paid for by Pfizer, and involved 760 children, from ages 6 months to 24 months, in Canada, Puerto Rico, Chile, Argentina, and the United States. Overall, nearly 90 percent of the children in the study got at least one dose of the Pfizer drug and most, about 95 percent, received two or more doses of the Pfizer drug, while a small number were treated with a placebo. While children received a shot of the new drug, they also received shots of the Pfizer booster — one at the beginning of the study and another at the end of the study.

The Pfizer booster clearly increased the effectiveness of the steroid and levodopa drug, the researchers found. The doses achieved by the dose of the Pfizer booster were similar to the doses reached by levodopa alone in the mice tested in the original study. They also found evidence that the booster reduced the symptoms of spasms.

The drugs are meant to increase the neurochemical receptors responsible for boosting the spasms, such as dopamine, glutamate and serotonin.

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