President Trump on vaccinations: Threats and guns on the sidewalk

Odds are this won’t improve much as we head into April. Dr. Gil Chavez, president of the state’s Board of Medical Examiners, recently shared an encounter with a group of anti-vaccine protesters outside his…

President Trump on vaccinations: Threats and guns on the sidewalk

Odds are this won’t improve much as we head into April.

Dr. Gil Chavez, president of the state’s Board of Medical Examiners, recently shared an encounter with a group of anti-vaccine protesters outside his Los Angeles home.

He said that the protester in question was waving a placard showing a bullet hole to show how vaccines can cause “brain damage” and that he was unhappy to see the doctor wearing his lab coat.

“I have a home office, I have my office in which I do paperwork,” he said. “To have a group of people on the sidewalk on a Sunday with signs and all that stuff there, that’s upsetting, particularly when they knew I was there. They didn’t see me.”

The allegations against anti-vaccine groups are hotly debated, however, with many accepting the data that vaccines do a great job of reducing disease.

Chavez said he knows the science to support his position, and that the protesters didn’t seem to.

“I hate to point out that I’m literally screaming from the rooftop all the time, but they don’t hear me,” he said. “You know, it’s one thing to make a distorted, deceptive message, but it’s another thing to not actually believe what they’re saying, to come and try to infiltrate somebody’s house with guns, not bothering them, just trying to intimidate them. That’s incredibly upsetting.”

The president said he tried to solve the situation peacefully, with one counter-protester wearing a protective vest giving Chavez a scare when she tried to get past.

His overriding message is that he just wants to treat everyone fairly, including those with vaccinations.

“First and foremost, I want to protect the patient,” he said. “The second one is I have to do my job and protect the patient and the third one is patients care most about doctors and helping patients and helping doctors and that’s why I’m so aggressive in my positions on this.”

The online reaction, especially from anti-vaccine groups, has not been nearly as vehement as the president acknowledged.

“Who said it, Gabby Giffords’ post here?” he said, responding to a retweet from the founder of Stop Common Core.

“I’m not going to emphasize too much what it was and how it actually caused me and my family to be saved, because it’s from 15 years ago.”

Still, the message he sent was retweeted and shared many times.

President Obama: “The CDC guidelines say that if parents have questions or concerns about vaccination, they can go to the doc for some more information.”

More VD: Pull up, check your boobs.

Or anyone for that matter.

Let’s go to history and rewind to 1996 and the presidential debates. The pro-life main character, George W. Bush, became the hero after sifting through complex polls. The pro-choice hero, Bill Clinton, was jeered, smeared and marginalized. No one said anything that made the subject of policy more complex.

That’s not to say that America’s 18-and-under years haven’t been long and controversial. But nowhere as passionate as our political discourse right now.

Here are some lowlights from the president’s usual Twitter feed, along with some advice for the proud pro-life pro-choice first lady.

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